Pembina County, ND

Pembina County, ND: Department Content

 

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Social Services
Homemaker / Personal Care Services
A Licensed Social Worker (Case Manager) is provided by the County to assist clients in accessing Homemaker and Personal Care Services. The Case Manager visits the client's home, conducts a comprehensive assessment of the client's overall functioning to determine appropriate services for the client, and monitors the client's condition and services.

Contact Person: Lynelle Fraser, Social Worker III

Case Management: A Licensed Social Worker (Case Manager) is provided by the County to assist clients in accessing Homemaker and Personal Care Services. The Case Manager visits the client’s home, conducts a comprehensive assessment of the client’s overall functioning to determine appropriate services for the client, and monitors the client’s condition and services.

Cost of Service: The cost of Homemaker, Personal Care Services, and Case Management Services varies with each person’s situation. Their liquid assets and monthly income, minus certain deductions, determine their fee, which is based on a sliding fee scale. For those clients who must pay a fee, Social Services sends a statement to them around the 10th of each month for the month that service were provided. There is no charge for the services of the Public Health Nurse in conjunction with supervising the In-Home Care Specialists in their provision of Personal Care Services.

Pembina County In-Home Care Specialists provide Homemaker and Personal Care services to enable elderly and disabled adults to remain in their own homes. These services are provided where no alternative services are available, if no relatives or friends are available, and if the help is needed on a regular basis, such as every other week, weekly, or up to three (3) times per week.

Homemaker Services:

Pembina County In-Home Care Specialists provide assistance with the following household tasks:

  • Light Housework: such as vacuuming, floor care, dusting, garbage removal, changing linens, etc.
  • Laundry: washing, drying, folding, ironing, mending, and related work.
  • Meal Preparation: planning, preparing, and serving the meal, as well as clean-up and dishwashing.
  • Shopping: for essential needs, such as groceries.
  • Money Management: assisting with budgeting and monthly bill-paying.
  • Communication: using the telephone, reading, and sending mail.

Personal Care Services:

Pembina County In-Home Care Specialists are able to assist with the following personal care tasks:

  • Bathing: bed, tub, shower, or bath.
  • Hair Care: bed or sink shampoo, set and comb hair, shave.
  • Teeth / Mouth / Denture Care
  • Dress / Undress: assist client in getting properly dressed or undressed.
  • Feeding / Eating: feeding a client who is unable to feed self, or assist client with routine regimen of eating.
  • Toileting / Continence: assist with routine regimen for toileting and care associated with incontinence.
  • Transfer in / out of bed or chair.
  • Turning / positioning client in bed.
  • Mobility (routine movement) inside home.
  • Eye Care: routine regimen of non-prescription eye drops, ointment, or eye pad.
  • Medication Assistance: limited to assisting client with self-administration of medications.
  • Skin Care: application of creams and lotions; treatment of minor skin problems.
  • Nail Care: routine finger nail care for homebound individuals (cannot cut toe nails).
  • Application of Antiembolic Stockings and Ace Wrap.
  • Care of Prosthetic, Orthotic, or Adaptive Device.
  • Temperature, Pulse, Respiration, and Blood Pressure.
  • Maintenance Exercises.
  • Assist Congnitively Impaired Client.
  • Other tasks that may be performed:
    • Ostomy Care (general maintenance)
    • Indwelling Bladder Catheter Care
    • Water Bath / Heat (whirlpool, etc.)
    • Postural / Bronchial Drainage
    • Bowel Program (suppository)

Department of Human Services Toll Free Numbers:

  • Main Switchboard: 1-800-472-2622
  • Child Support 1-800-231-4255
  • SNAP / LIHEAP 1-800-755-2716
  • Medical Services 1-800-755-2604
  • Aging Services 1-855-462-5465
  • Children & Family Services 1-800-245-3736
  • Children’s Special Health Services 1-800-755-2714
  • Disability Services 1-800-755-8529
  • Mental Health Services 1-800-755-2719
  • Substance Abuse Services 1-800-642-6042

Other Helpful Toll Free Numbers:

  • AIDS Hotline 1-800-472-2180
  • Alzheimer’s Association 1-800-438-4380
  • American Cancer Society 1-800-342-4535
  • American Heart Association 1-800-532-8688
  • Arthritis Foundation 1-800-437-5845
  • Ask-A-Nurse (24 hours) 1-800-552-0190
  • BCI Drug Hotline 1-800-472-2185
  • Better Hearing Institute 1-800-327-9355
  • Domestic Violence 1-800-472-2911
  • Drug Abuse Hotline 1-800-642-6042
  • Epileptic Foundation 1-800-292-7932
  • Farm Stress 1-800-642-4752
  • Housing Discrimination 1-800-424-8590
  • Legal Aid of North Dakota 1-800-634-5263
  • Mental Health Association 1-800-472-2911
  • Multiple Sclerosis Society 1-800-437-4757
  • Poison Control Center – Fargo 1-800-732-2200
  • Red Cross 1-800-832-0120
  • Social Security Administration 1-800-772-1213
  • Suicide Prevention 1-800-472-2911
  • Veteran’s Administration 1-800-827-1000


REV: 04-2010

Social Services
Social Service Programs
All Social Service Programs are administered by Licensed Social Workers or a designee.

Children’s Special Health Services:

Diagnostic services for treatment for children who have certain crippling conditions. There are income and resource maximums for eligibility.

Day Care Licensing:

Complete licensing for interested applicants.

Foster Care Licensing:

The provision of substitute parental care when children need to be removed from their home. Licensure is required.

  • What is Foster Care for children? Foster Care is a supportive service available to families experiencing problems. It is considered / available for a child when all other alternatives to out-of-home placement have been explored or tried.
  • What is Foster Care Placement? When it is not possible for a child to remain in his or her own family’s home, temporary alternative placement in a licensed foster home is an option considered. Foster Parents provide a nurturing and secure family environment until the child returns home.
  • How are Foster Parents selected? The child’s needs influence the foster home selected. Foster care is a service to children whose emotional, social, and physical needs are of utmost importance. The agency matches the child to the foster home and works with the foster child, the child’s parents, and the foster family to provide the best foster care experience possible in working towards early return to the child’s home, if that is the goal.
  • How long does a child stay in Foster Care? Length of stay in foster care varies depending on the case plan and ranged from brief emergency care to placement over a period o months, or to planned long-term foster care.
  • How do I become a Foster Parent? Licensure is required. The process involves making application to your local County Social Service office, a home study, fire and safety checks of the home, and references. There is no fee for licensure.
  • Will I be paid? The Foster Parents will receive a maintenance reimbursement for the care of the foster child depending upon the child’s age. Specialized payments are also made depending upon the needs of the child and the care/effort required.
  • Is there a need for Foster Homes in Pembina County? Y-E-S!

Parent Aide Services:

This program is to empower parents to more effectively parent their children. This service helps prevent out-of-home placements.

Prime Time Day Care:

The program provides child care for families in crisis. These services are intended to enable parents to attend parenting classes, therapy, or respite from parenting responsibilities.

Crossroads Program:

This program may be available to parents who are age 20 years or under, who are the primary caretaker of their child, and who are pursuing their high school diploma, alternative high school placement, or a GED program. Child care costs are paid for the child while the parent is attending school.

Subsidized Adoption:

Provides financial assistance to assure the adoption of children whose handicap, age, sibling group, or minority background might otherwise prevent their adoption,

Family Home Care:

Assists persons who are experiencing difficulty living independently and unable to provide for their own needs.

Child Protection Services:

Social Services in mandated by law to complete an assessment with regards to all alleged concerns our agency receives regarding children, ages 0-18, who are allegedly being neglected or abused that fall within the Child Abuse/Neglect Law. This assessment is completed by a licensed social worker to determine what, if any, services are needed to protect and promote the safety and well-being and permanence of children. All individuals making a report of concern regarding a child are protected by law and are kept confidential.

To report Child Abuse or Neglect, go to the following URL for the appropriate reporting form:

www.nd.gov/eforms/doc/sfn00960.pdf

Supervision Guidelines:

The following information is reprinted verbatim from the Brochure entitled, “Home Alone – Is Your Child Ready?,” which is provided by the North Dakota Department of Human Services, Children & Family Services Division, Child Protection Services.

Is your child ready for self-care? There are both risks and opportunities associated with self-care. Parents need to carefully decide whether self-care is appropriate for their children.
Most parents are aware of threats from accidents, fire, or harm from strangers and make special efforts to deal with them. There are also dangers to children’s emotional well-being.
Children in self-care must deal with feelings of loneliness, boredom, fear, rejection, and insecurity. The increased responsibility for chores and caring for younger siblings may be more than a child is ready to handle.  Sometimes, older siblings physically or sexually abuse a younger child left in their care. Teenagers can turn their fear and loneliness inward, leading to depression. Experimenting with sex, drugs, tobacco, and alcohol are much more likely with teens in self-care. Peer pressure, too, can be a negative influence, which a child may not have the confidence to overcome.
When parents invest time and energy to make the right decision about self-care for their children, the potential benefits increase. Children can gain an increased sense of self-confidence, responsibility, and independence.
Who is responsible? The ultimate responsibility for the safety, care, well being and behavior of children remains with the parent or caregiver, whether they are there to personally supervise them or not.
What does the law say about child supervision? North Dakota does not have a law which provides an age when children can be left alone. However, guidelines have been developed by the Department of Human Services and are used by County Social Service Agencies in North Dakota.
What are the age guidelines? Children left home alone should be able to demonstrate knowledge of where their parents or other responsible adults are, how to reach them, and the length of time caregivers will be absent. Children should also know emergency procedures and arrangements for emergency situations.
·        Ages 0-4: The guidelines state that all children under age 4 years be in view of their caregiver at all times while outside of the home. Inside the home, the caregiver should be available and able to respond to the child to provide immediate care and protection from harm. Children of this age should not be left in vehicles unless they are in proper restraints (unable to put the vehicle into gear) and in direct view of the caregiver at all times.
·        Ages 4-17: Children 8 years and under should be supervised at all times with a caregiver available. An 8 year old should not be left in charge of other children.
Children who are 9 years old should not be left unsupervised for periods of greater than two hours during the daytime. A child of this age should not be unsupervised at night and should not supervise other children.
Children who are 10 and 11 years old may be left alone for longer periods of time. However, caution is advised in leaving a child unsupervised during sleeping hours. Children this age should not be responsible for younger children.
Children who are the age of 12 years and older may be permitted to act as babysitters. It is recommended that they successfully complete an approved child care training course.
Caution is advised on the number of children left in care, length of time for caregiving responsibility, factors regarding special needs of children left in care and resources available to the child providing care.
·        Teens: Children under age 15 years of age should be attended overnight. Caution should be taken in leaving 15-17 year olds alone overnight. Extended absences of caregivers (such as over a weekend) are not recommended.
Is age the only factor to consider? The age of the child is not the only factor that should be considered when children are left alone. Other factors include:
·        The maturity of the child.
·        Emotional health factors.
·        The child’s physical or mental limitations.
·        Length of time alone.
·        Time of day or night.
·        Other children present to be supervised.
·        Location and environmental conditions.
·        Frequency of being left alone.
·        The accessibility of a parent or other.
Using the guidelines and other factors mentioned … consider the following Questions & Tips:
·        How does your child feel about the situation?
·        Look at the child’s age in relationship to growth, behavior, and judgment.
·        What are the responsibilities your child will be left with?
·        Will the child be able to handle those responsibilities?
·        How long will the child be left alone? The first few times should be quite short. You will be able to stay away longer once the child is confident about safety.
·        What are the safety risks if your child is alone? (fires, accidents, burglaries, etc.)
·        Can your child say no to peer pressure if friends encourage the child to break rules in your absence?
Safety Tips to consider:
·        Encourage the child to discuss feelings about being alone. If a child seems afraid, help her to talk about it and help her feel safe. Establish ground rules. This avoids confusion about what you expect and adds to the child’s own sense of security. Careful planning can help insure physical safety and emotional well-being for your child.
·        Remove fire hazards and install smoke detectors. Hold fire drills with each child “practicing” what to do and where to go in case of fire.
·        Teach children basic first aid and have a first aid kit available.
·        Have children practice emergency (911) calls with you, giving their full address and directions if necessary.
·        Review safety rules such as not playing with matches, knives, and scissors.
·        Teach children when and if to answer the door and phone. Warn children to never let strangers into the house.
·        Instruct children to never tell callers that they are alone. They should say that the parent is busy and offer to take a message. If a call seems suspicious, they should call you or another adult. 
·        Have a clear understanding about use of ovens, stoves, and other appliances.
·        Provide projects and materials, as well as juice and nutritious snacks.
·        Set up an emergency plan with a relative, friend, or neighbor who may be unable to care for your child, but who would be willing to be called by the child for advice or reassurance in “small emergencies” when you are unavailable by phone.
·        When you leave, post your house address and important phone numbers near the telephone.
·        Establish a daily routine in which your child calls you or a designated person when she arrives home.
·        If your child comes home after school, give her keys and perhaps an attractive key chain. The keys should be carried out of sight so that the child isn’t easily identified as one on her own.
·        Arrange some after school activities such as clubs, scouts, sports or the library. If you need help with transportation, arrange to trade weekend driving or child care with other parents.
·        When you return home, praise your child for doing a good job. You may be pleasantly surprised at how readily and how well your child assumes responsibility when fully prepared and given the opportunity.
·        For more information, please call your local County Social Service Agency.
Tax Equalization
Assessment Process
The property tax is an ad valorem tax, that is, a tax based upon value. It's the primary means by which local government pays for services it provides, such as police and fire protection, schools, roads, parks, courts, etc. It involves two separate functions, the assessment function and the budget function. After these functions are completed, the county auditor calculates the appropriate mill rate and that rate is applied to each taxable property to determine the property tax.

Assessment Process

The property tax is an ad valorem tax, that is, a tax based upon value. It's the primary means by which local government pays for services it provides, such as police and fire protection, schools, roads, parks, courts, etc. It involves two separate functions, the assessment function and the budget function. After these functions are completed, the county auditor calculates the appropriate mill rate and that rate is applied to each taxable property to determine the property tax.

The assessor is responsible for discovering, listing and valuing all taxable property. All real property is subject to taxation, unless expressly exempted by law. All property is valued according to its value on February 1 st of each year. All real property is valued at True and Full Value. For residential and commercial property, this equals market value. For agricultural value, it equals its productivity value as defined by North Dakota statute.

The assessor must notify property owners when the valuation increases more than 15% and more than $3,000 True and Full Value. In April of each year, the assessor's assessments are reviewed by the city or township boards of equalization. Within the first ten (10) days of June, the county reviews the assessments of cities and townships. During August of each year, the State Board of Equalization reviews the assessments as finalized by the various counties.

The assessor, by the fair and accurate valuation of property, ensures that everyone shares equitably in the total burden of property taxation.

 

Tax Equalization
Exemptions
New or expanding business projects may be granted an exemption for up to five years, in addition to extensions. Please contact your local assessor or the Pembina County Director of Equalization office for additional information, as the rules are somewhat complex. You can also visit the State Tax Commissioner web site at: http://www.nd.gov/tax

New or expanding business projects may be granted an exemption for up to five years, in addition to extensions. Please contact your local assessor or the Pembina County Director of Equalization office for additional information, as the rules are somewhat complex.  You can also visit the State Tax Commissioner web site at: http://www.nd.gov/tax

Certain new single family residences may be exempt up to $75,000 in value for two years if approved by the respective city. Please check with your city assessor to see if the program is offered. The program is not currently available for residences located in a township.

Homes owned and occupied by persons who are blind or have certain disabilities may be eligible for exemption.

Generally speaking, most personal property is exempt.

Certain energy systems and pollution control systems may be exempt.

Charitable, religious, and certain non-profit organization property may be entitled to exemption.

Farm structures are generally exempt. Farm residences occupied by bona fide farmers are also exempt, subject to additional tests.

The exemptions listed above are not all inclusive. Most exemptions are listed in the NDCC 57-02-08. Please contact your local assessor or the Pembina County Director of Equalization for additional information and application forms. Additional information is available at the web site for the State Tax Commissioner .

Tax Equalization
Appealing Your Assessment
If you feel that your property assessment is excessive and does not represent True and Full value, you may ask for relief.

Appealing Your Assessment

If you feel that your property assessment is excessive and does not represent True and Full value, you may ask for relief.

You should contact your local assessor immediately and ask that your assessment be reviewed.

If you and the assessor cannot agree on a proper assessment, then you may appeal in two different manners. If the current year valuation is at issue, then you may appeal by attending the various equalization meetings. In order to be heard before the State Board of Equalization, you must have appeared before the local and county boards of equalization.

You may also file an abatement on your property for current and previous years relief. You must file by November 1 st of the year following the year the tax becomes delinquent. In other words, you must file by November 1 st , 2006 to file for the 2004 assessment.

In either case, the burden of proof falls upon the applicant to show that the valuation is incorrect. Therefore, the applicant would need to present information showing that the assessment is not correct.

For additional information, you may visit the Office of State Tax Commissioner Web Site pgs. 7-8 of the Taxpayer Bill of Rights. You can also download the abatement application form at this site. You can also contact our office for additional information.

Tax Equalization
Homestead Credit Program
Homeowners who are 65 years of age or older or who are permanently and totally disabled may be entitled to a property tax credit. Qualifications include an annual income less medical expenses of $14,500 or less (including Social Security and pensions) and assets of $50,000 or less (excluding the first $100,000 value of the homestead). The applicant may receive a credit up to $3,038 in taxable value of the homestead.

Homeowners who are 65 years of age or older or who are permanently and totally disabled may be entitled to a property tax credit. Qualifications include an annual income less medical expenses of $14,500 or less (including Social Security and pensions) and assets of $50,000 or less (excluding the first $100,000 value of the homestead). The applicant may receive a credit up to $3,038 in taxable value of the homestead.

In addition, the homeowner may qualify for a special assessment credit which becomes a lien against the property and must be repaid when the property is sold.

For additional information and applications, please contact your local assessor or the Pembina County Director of Equalization office.

Renters may also be entitled to a rent refund under this program. Those who qualify may receive rent refunds of up to $240 if 20% of the rent they pay exceeds 4% of their income. Renters apply to the Office of State Tax Commissioner for this refund and applications are available at the Pembina County Director of Equalization office.

Additional information on the program is also available at the State Tax Commissioners Web Site

Weed Control
NOTICE FOR CUTTING HAY IN DITCHES
Some of the herbicides used may have a haying or grazing restriction.

Operators who wish to cut and make ditch hay, please be advised that Pembina County Weed Control may have sprayed portions of the road ditches with herbicides for noxious weed control.  Some of the herbicides used may have a haying or grazing restriction, meaning a certain amount of time must pass after herbicide application and before haying or grazing operations may begin.  These restrictions are determined by the herbicide label.
Since spraying operations will be conducted over the course of the summer and are dependent upon the weather, it is impossible to set a timetable for spraying and haying in any specific area.  If anyone is planning to cut ditch hay they should contact the Weed Control Officer to determine if and when a specific area has been treated and what the restriction timeline is.   Operators wishing to not have their ditches sprayed prior to haying should contact the Weed Control Officer, Kadie Benson @ 701-520-0076 or email at kadiebenson@yahoo.com.